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5 skincare superfood myths debunked

5 skincare superfood myths debunked

Here’s why these superfood hacks aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

If only healthy living was as easy as eating copious amounts of certain foods. While there are many that have been given a “super” label, in truth, many everyday ingredients can offer the same nutritional benefits, if not more. Here are some of the common superfoods everyone’s raving about.

Chia Seeds

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This Central American superfood has been all the rage in the past few years — for nutritionists as well as skincare experts. The seeds are supposedly high in vitamin B6, which reduces skin roughness, acne and the effects of sunburn — protecting skin from developing sun spots. That sounds good, right? Well, not so fast. Tests show that even the humble sesame seed has a higher vitamin B6 content, and is also richer in cell-regenerating calcium.

Almonds

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Many people have been turning to almond oil to fix their skincare woes, lured by claims that it’s high in antioxidants, which can give life to dull-looking skin. But compared to fish, spinach, eggs and chicken, almonds are relatively low in the key antioxidant chemicals that fight wrinkle-causing free radicals and acne outbreaks that can contribute to the appearance of an uneven skin tone.

Fennel

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High in vitamins and flavonoid antioxidants — what’s there to not like about fennel? Well, there is one thing, and it’s called psoralen. This chemical, also found in lemons, makes your skin sensitive to light. Too much psoralen on your skin could encourage blistering, burning and even age spots. Ouch.

Goji berries

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A mainstay of Chinese medicine, some skincare experts have been raving about the zeaxanthin content of these little red berries. Zeaxanthin is thought to reduce the damaging effects of UV light on your skin. Although zeaxanthin does sound good for you, there are tons of other everyday ingredients that are rich in it too, like spinach, eggs, peas, cabbage and peppers.

Kale

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You wouldn’t be completely wrong in believing kale is good for you, as it’s packed with vitamins A, C, E and K — all essential for even skin tone and skin health. But what many don’t know is that having too much raw kale can lead to hypothyroidism, when the thyroid is underactive and does not make enough of the thyroid hormone. Some of the early symptoms include pale or dry skin, weight gain and brittle hair. The fix? Cook your kale. But you don’t need to go out of your way to get kale. Broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and other such cruciferous vegetables have the same nutrients required for good skin health.